Unsettling Accounts: Neither Truth Nor Reconciliation in Confessions of State Violence. LEIGH A. PAYNE: Durham & London: Duke University Press, 2008.
PDF

Keywords

PAYNE
Reconciliation
state
civility
Feitlowitz

How to Cite

Feitlowitz, M. (2010). Unsettling Accounts: Neither Truth Nor Reconciliation in Confessions of State Violence. LEIGH A. PAYNE: Durham & London: Duke University Press, 2008. Estudios Interdisciplinarios De América Latina Y El Caribe, 21(1). Retrieved from http://eial.tau.ac.il/index.php/eial/article/view/106

Abstract

Fora scholar who studies torture in the context of state-sanctioned violence,Leigh Payne sustains great faith in democracy. In fact, the resiliency andresourcefulness of transitional democracies to confront, process, and utilizehorrific "confessions" is a major theme in her valuable book. Payne positionsher argument squarely between two competing schools of thought: that the full,graphic accounts of evil-doers (in controlled settings, such as South Africa'sTruth and Reconciliation Commission [TRC]) ultimately lead to healing andreconciliation; and the belief that "too much truth" undermines, even endangers, the return to civility. Payne argues for what she terms "contentiouscoexistence."
PDF

Copyright © 2012-2013 Estudios Interdisciplinarios de América Latina y el Caribe.
ISSN 0792-7061
Editores:  Ori Preuss; Nahuel Ribke
Instituto Sverdlin de Historia y Cultura de América Latina, Escuela de Historia
Universidad de Tel Aviv, Ramat Aviv,
P.O.B. 39040 (69978), Israel.
Correo electrónico:  eial.journal@gmail.com
Fax: 972-3-6406931